August #104 : Read My Lipo - by David Gelman, MD

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Table of Contents

Don't Mess With These Girls

Boiling Point

You Go, Uganda

Miami Vice

Mighty Avengers

Firing Squad for Docs?

Earthwatch

Risky Business

Pos & Neg

Blog Rollin’

Briefs

Milestones

The Normal Heartache

Film Review: Monkey Business

Carb Your Enthusiasm

Partner Briefs

The Tao of Toe

Read My Lipo

His 'n' Her Hormones

Budding Romance

The Multidrug-Resistance Challenge

Growing Pains

Check, Please

Founder's Letter

Mailbox

With Honors



Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


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August 2004

Read My Lipo

by David Gelman, MD

Here’s the skinny on body-morphing side effects whose four-letter prefix is short for “lipid,” or fat. Stretch your vocabulary.

Lipodystrophy —Abnormal fat changes, whether loss or gain. Both protease paunch and sunken cheeks, for instance, are badges. (See “Lipo: The LatestPOZ, September 2002.)

Lipoatrophy— Fat loss, most often in the limbs, buttocks and face. Losing subcutaneous fat (right under the skin) can bulge veins and sink cheeks. Nukes, especially Zerit (d4T), could be culprits. (Some ways to save face: “Cheek to Chic” April 2004.)

Lipoaccumulation— Fat gain, sometimes also called lipohypertrophy, most often in the belly and women’s breasts. Unlike your basic subcutaneous fat, this extra padding usually runs deeper (visceral fat), surrounding the abdominal organs. It can also pile on above the shoulder blades, causing buffalo hump. Most docs finger protease inhibitors or a mix of PIs and nukes, but buildup has also afflicted HIVers on protease-free regimens.

Hyperlipidemia- We’re talking inflated levels of common blood fats—cholesterol and triglycerides (see “Zip Your LIPids” November 2003). They can climb unassisted (through lousy diet or bad-luck genetics), in which case nix the lipo link. But they can also affect lipoatrophy or lipoaccumulation sufferers, landing a one-two paunch. (To fight back: “All Diet on the Western Front”.)




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