June #71 : Herb Of The Month: Hawthorn - by Michael Onstott

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Table of Contents

Longtime Companion

Generation AIDS

It's A Small AIDS World After All

Marsha Burnett

Ruben Rodriguez

How They Shot AIDS: A Viral Video Roundup & Takedown

AIDS Movie Must-Haves

Words to Live By

Memento Mori

Quotes: 20/20 Hindsight

Birth of a Notion

About Face

Life After Birth

Serostim Sabotaged!

Herb Of The Month: Hawthorn

Warning: A Riff on Amps

Natural Woman

The Right Angle

Hotline Help Me!

Under My Skin

Editor's Letter

Mailbox

First Case Scenario

Songs In The Key Of Life



Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


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June 2001

Herb Of The Month: Hawthorn

by Michael Onstott

PARTS TO USE: Flowers, leaves, berries

FORMS: Capsules, tablets, liquid extract, syrup, tea

DAILY DOSE: 120-240 mg (capsules), 1 tsp. liquid extract or syrup, or 1 tsp. herb (as tea) -- each taken three times per day

COST: $7-$20 monthly

CAUTIONS: Hawthorn may boost the effects of some heart meds (such as digoxin) and cause high blood pressure when taken with beta-blockers (drugs for angina, hypertension, arrhythmia and migraine). Consult your doctor.

Hawthorn is a slow-working, effective and nontoxic heart tonic. It is used to lower blood pressure, treat mild, chronic congestive heart failure and irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia) and aid recovery after a heart attack. Over time, hawthorn strengthens the heart muscle and enhances blood circulation and oxygen use. This thorny member of the rose family has been pressed into service for centuries to treat urinary tract and stomach ailments. Today, the antioxidant herb is prized for its natural constituents -- flavonoids and proanthocyanidins -- which dilate and relax blood vessels, lowering blood pressure and improving the heart's pumping power. Hawthorn works best over a period of weeks or months and is generally not an herb to self-prescribe, especially if you're on heart meds. Ask your "herb-savvy" doc for his or her berry best advice.




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