November #41 : A Mantra a Day - by Bo Young

POZ - Health, Life and HIV
Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
E-newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:

Back to home » Archives » POZ Magazine issues




Table of Contents

Organizing Inside

Concealed Weapon

Long Day's Journey

Lethal Lottery

Natural Bootleg

Double-Crossed

One for the Books

Flying Ace

Tucker: The Man and His Dream

Hatch a Plan

Signs of Life

The Trouble With Norvir

Engine No. 48,000

S.O.S.

To the Editor

None the Wiser

Tomato, Tomahto

Enter at Your Own Risk

Say What

Swim Lessons

Stigma Enigma

Daddy’s Helper

Nushawn on the Block

Privacy Parsed

Equal Protection for All

“Just Say No” to Welfare

Ms. Thurman Goes to Washington

POZ Picks

Show and Tell

The Eye in the Storm

Get Our Phil

POZarazzi: AIDS! The Musical

Verse: Amirah

Obits

One for the Books

Flying Ace

Tucker: The Man and His Dream

Hatch a Plan

Poetic License

Poetic License

The Vision Thing

Stop the World, I want to Get Off

Surviving Behind the Walls

Prick and Tell

The Bitter End

Draining the Reservoirs

Testosterone Beats Fatigue

Carnitine Boosts CD4s

Multivitamins for Moms

Bleach Works

HIV Med Line

Weight List

Do the Hustle

A Mantra a Day

Attack of the Monster Combo

Helper Cells

He Still Is What He Is

Dark Secrets



Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


email print

November 1998

A Mantra a Day

by Bo Young

De-stress with meditation

Centering of the mind, a crucial healing tool for people with HIV, isn’t something you’d associate with hellish prison life. Yet an age-old technique to accomplish just that—meditation—is being taught to a growing number of inmates. Studies have found that consistent meditation can strengthen the immune system and reduce disease-worsening stress.

But what appeals most to wardens is the practice’s pacifying effect, first shown in 1993 at India’s largest prison, in New Delhi. A new superintendent, upset by widespread drug use and infighting, invited instructors in the 2,500-year-old method of Vipassana meditation to conduct courses for the prisoners. The behavioral improvements were so dramatic that the practice spread throughout Indian prisons and then internationally.

Classic Vipassana meditation takes two hours a day (an hour in the morning and evening), but any time spent is beneficial. It involves sitting quietly and focusing awareness, first on breathing and then on the body overall. Thomas Crisman, a coordinator of the Vipassana School’s  Prison Program, says the method “allows the mind to unlearn old stress reactions and achieve a new balance.”

The school’s 10-day training course is free. “We only require that a prison administrator first attend a course at one of our centers,” Crisman says. “During the course at the prison, we ask that the institution provide vegetarian meals for both teachers and students because of this food’s simplicity, plus facilities to isolate the participants.” Course enrollments have ranged from seven to 1,000.

Crisman says people with HIV have been enthusiastic about the benefits of meditation: “It helps them reduce stress and face the physical challenges of their illness. And it gives them a new lease on a life sentence, whether that’s prison or HIV.”

Vipassana meditation is taught at the Seattle North Rehabilitation Facility, and discussions are under way with the Texas, Vermont and federal prison systems. The Vipassana School has centers in California, Washington, Texas and Massachusetts. For more information, write Thomas Crisman, 1445 Ross Avenue, Suite 3200, Dallas, TX 75202; phone 214.855.4785; or visit www.dhamma.org. A video called Doing Time, Doing Vipassana and a book on Vipassana titled The Art of Living by William Hart (Harper Collins/New York) can be ordered online at www.pariyatti.com.




[Go to top]

Join POZ Facebook Twitter Google+ MySpace YouTube Tumblr Flickr
Quick Links
Current Issue

HIV 101
HIV Testing
Safer Sex
Find a Date
Newly Diagnosed
Disclosing Your Status
Starting Treatment
Search for the Cure
POZ Stories
POZ TV
Read the Blogs
Visit the Forums
Women
African American
Latino
Providers
Job Listings
Events Calendar


    fokisi
    Long Beach
    California


    TanyaB
    Delray Beach
    Florida


    hollywoodvers1
    Los Angeles
    California


    jacob2608
    Panama City Beach
    Florida
Click here to join POZ Personals!
Ask POZ Pharmacist

Talk to Us
Poll
Can social media help stop HIV stigma?
Yes
No

Survey
Mind Matters

more surveys
Contact Us
We welcome your comments!
[ about Smart + Strong | about POZ | POZ advisory board | partner links | advertising policy | advertise/contact us | site map]
© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy.
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.