August / September #16 : London Bridges - by Justine Buchanan

POZ - Health, Life and HIV
Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
Newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:

Back to home » Archives » POZ Magazine issues




Table of Contents

The POZ 50 Most Innovative AIDS Researchers

Attack of the Mutation Monster

A Woman of Substance

Into Africa

Above Average

Rock the Boat

Where the Heart Is

London Bridges

Roman Knows

The Way They Weren't

Now, Voyager

Chow Now

All in the Family

S.O.S.

Touch Me, Please

Memory Serves

Never Trust a Doctor

Global Warning

Kids' Stuff

Dynamic Duo: Marlene & Margaretha Diaz

Gathering Intelligence of the Resistance

Bleach Ball

Painless Punctures

Everything in Perspective

Food Frights

Pediatric Protocol



Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


email print

August / September 1996

London Bridges

by Justine Buchanan

BBC star Nigel Wrench spans the radio waves

Seated amid the biggest names in UK radio at the annual Sony awards ceremony -- the industry's equivalent of the Oscars -- Nigel Wrench nervously awaited the announcement for Best Feature Program of 1994.

The 34-year-old host of the BBC's leading drive-time radio news show was, on this occasion, hoping to be rewarded for his other, more unique role -- that of host on Out This Week, the only national weekly gay show.

As the Best Feature category drew near, Wrench suddenly decided to reword his acceptance speech. He leaned across the table to Out This Week's producer. "What if I tell them that I'm HIV positive?" His colleague's eyes widened. "Are you sure you want to do this?"

The moment arrived. The envelope was opened. Out This Week had won. Minutes later, Wrench held the statue aloft and came out as HIV positive.

One year later, Wrench recalls the occasion over sausage, bacon and eggs in a café close to the BBC.

"It's not very often that you find yourself in that little position of power that getting an award gives to you," he says. "You weren't apologizing for having HIV. You were saying, 'I've just won an award that I'm sure a lot of you would have liked to have won. And, by the way, I'm HIV positive.'"

"It was absolutely the right thing to do," he adds. "I'd thought there'd be a slight intake of breath. What I hadn't expected was this enormous outpouring of warmth. Afterward, very senior people came up to me and said what a courageous thing it was to do. Everybody at work has been very supportive."

Working for a public organization like the BBC gave Nigel the confidence to go public about being positive. Had he been working for a commercial broadcaster, his continued career as a news show host might not have been so assured.

But Wrench is used to taking risks. Raised in South Africa, he cut his teeth as a journalist during the politically turbulent 1980s, reporting on the violence for CNN and NPR. But, at 29, he decided to return home to a more stable existence in England.

It was also a chance to be openly gay. Since then, he's attempted, as he puts it, "to have relationships." Although he remains the consummate clubber -- "currently, I'm favoring Britpop" -- he's also no stranger to leather bars: "Everyone should have a bit of sleaze in their lives." Then it's home to the suburbs, Maria Callas blasting from a CD player worth far more than his dilapidated classic French car.

Work beckons. Wrench rises to go but discovers his trousers are torn. "I knew there was a reason why I wasn't wearing these," he says. "They're very expensive, darling -- Paul Smith."




[Go to top]

Facebook Twitter Google+ MySpace YouTube Tumblr Flickr Instagram
Quick Links
Current Issue

HIV Testing
Safer Sex
Find a Date
Newly Diagnosed
HIV 101
Disclosing Your Status
Starting Treatment
Help Paying for Meds
Search for the Cure
POZ Stories
POZ Opinion
POZ Exclusives
Read the Blogs
Visit the Forums
Job Listings
Events Calendar
POZ on Twitter

Ask POZ Pharmacist

Talk to Us
Poll
Should the U.S. gay blood ban end?
Yes
No

Survey
Smoke Signals

more surveys
Contact Us
We welcome your comments!
[ about Smart + Strong | about POZ | POZ advisory board | partner links | advertising policy | advertise/contact us | site map]
© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy.
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.