October/November #175 : Going Norvir-Free? - by Laura Whitehorn

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October / November 2011

Going Norvir-Free?

by Laura Whitehorn

To work most effectively, protease inhibitors (PIs) have long relied on a boost from Norvir (ritonavir).

For years, Norvir has been the only PI booster available. A new one, cobicistat, could win FDA approval next year, offering Norvir-takers another choice. In anticipation of the drug’s approval, a fixed dose, single pill combination of Prezista (darunavir) with a cobicistat boost is being tested.

If that works, we could see two new all-in-one quadruple pills—each a complete HIV regimen in one swallow—on pharmacy  shelves. One quad will combine Prezista with cobicistat, Emtriva (emtricita-bine) and GS 7340 (an experimental drug similar to Viread/tenofovir, but possibly more powerful and longer lasting). The other quad will combine cobicistat with elvitegravir (an experimental integrase inhibitor), Emtriva and Viread. For more details on this new med, search “cobicistat” on poz.com.

Another all-in-one is already available: Complera (Edurant/rilpivirine plus Viread plus Emtriva) is approved for people starting their first HIV regimen.

Search: protease inhibitor, PI, Norvir, cobicistat, Prezista, Emtriva, Viread, Complera


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