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November 8, 2011

Creating an AIDS-Free Generation

Our efforts must begin with the American public:  from people living with the disease, to researchers in academic medical centers; to individual donors, businesses, and foundations; and philanthropies – two of my favorite ones, the Clinton Foundation – (laughter) – which helped make treatment more affordable by supporting innovative ways to manufacture and purchase drugs; the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has underwritten breakthrough research.

But let’s remind ourselves no institution in the world has done more than the United States Government.  (Applause.)  We have produced a track record of excellence in science.  Researchers right here at the NIH conducted pivotal research that identified HIV and proved that it did cause AIDS.  The first drug to treat AIDS was supported by the United States.  Today we are making major investments in the search for a vaccine; for tools like microbicides, which give women the power to protect themselves; and other lifesaving innovations.

Alongside our research and development work, the United States has led a global effort to bring these advances to bear in saving lives.  When my husband was president, he appointed America’s first AIDS czar and more than tripled U.S. investments in preventing and treating AIDS worldwide.  And in 2003, President Bush, with strong bipartisan support from Congress, made the momentous decision to launch the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, or PEPFAR.  

At that time, only 50,000 people in Sub-Saharan Africa were receiving the antiretroviral drugs that would keep them alive.  Now, more than 5 million do, along with more than a million people in other regions of the world, and the vast majority receive drugs financed by either PEPFAR or the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, which the United States helped create.

And PEPFAR is having an impact far beyond AIDS.  It has expanded on the World Health Organization’s efforts to treat and prevent tuberculosis, which is the leading cause of death among people with AIDS.  PEPFAR has also helped build new facilities throughout our partner countries that see patients not just for HIV/AIDS, but for malaria, for immunizations, and much more.  To staff these clinics, we have helped train a new cadre of professional health workers who are making their countries more self-sufficient.  In some countries, the same trucks that deliver AIDS medicine now also deliver bed nets to prevent malaria. 

For all these reasons, PEPFAR is one of the strong platforms upon which the Obama Administration is building our Global Health Initiative, which supports one-stop clinics offering an array of health services while driving down costs, driving up impact, and saving more lives.  I say all of this because I want the American people to understand the irreplaceable role the United States has played in the fight against HIV/AIDS.  It is their tax dollars, our tax dollars, that have made this possible, and we need to keep going.

To be sure, we have done it in an ever-expanding partnership with other governments, multilateral institutions, implementing organizations, the private sector, civil society groups, especially those led by people living with the virus.  But the world could not have come this far without us, and it will not defeat AIDS without us.

What’s more, our efforts have helped set the stage for a historic opportunity, one that the world has today:  to change the course of this pandemic and usher in an AIDS-free generation.

Now, by an AIDS-free generation, I mean one where, first, virtually no children are born with the virus; second, as these children become teenagers and adults, they are at far lower risk of becoming infected than they would be today thanks to a wide range of prevention tools; and third, if they do acquire HIV, they have access to treatment that helps prevent them from developing AIDS and passing the virus on to others.  

Now, HIV may be with us well into the future.  But the disease that it causes need not be.  This is, I admit, an ambitious goal, and I recognize I am not the first person to envision it.  But creating an AIDS-free generation has never been a policy priority for the United States Government until today, because this goal would have been unimaginable just a few years ago.  Yet today, it is possible because of scientific advances largely funded by the United States and new practices put in place by this Administration and our many partners.  Now while the finish line is not yet in sight, we know we can get there, because now we know the route we need to take.  It requires all of us to put a variety of scientifically proven prevention tools to work in concert with each other.  Just as doctors talk about combination treatment – prescribing more than one drug at a time – we all must step up our use of combination prevention.    

America’s combination prevention strategy focuses on a set of interventions that have been proven most effective – ending mother-to-child transmission, expanding voluntary medical male circumcision, and scaling up treatment for people living with HIV/AIDS.  Now of course, interventions like these can’t be successful in isolation.  They work best when combined with condoms, counseling and testing, and other effective prevention interventions.  And they rely on strong systems and personnel, including trained community health workers.  They depend on institutional and social changes like ending stigma; reducing discrimination against women and girls; stopping gender-based violence and exploitation, which continue to put women and girls at higher risk of HIV infection; and repealing laws that make people criminals simply because of their sexual orientation.

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Search: Hillary Clinton, National Institutes of Health


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  comments 1 - 2 (of 2 total)    

Eddie m, Blantyre, 2011-11-11 05:32:21
I am a MALAWIAN who is hiv positive,i am grateful to the American people and their dollars for the massive support,however i would appreciate if you would attach strict conditions to avoid corrupt govt officials from enriching themselves at our expense

Richard McCormick, Redwood City, 2011-11-10 13:00:12
What the HELL does "Voluntary Male Circumcision" have to do with HIV AIDS?? Seriously??

comments 1 - 2 (of 2 total)    


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