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November 8, 2011

Creating an AIDS-Free Generation

Even as we recognize all these crucial elements, today I want to focus on the three key interventions that can make it possible to achieve an AIDS-free generation.  First, preventing mother-to-child transmission.  Today, one in seven new infections occurs when a mother passes the virus to her child.  We can get that number to zero.  I keep saying zero; my speechwriter keeps saying “Virtually zero.”  (Laughter, applause.)  And we can save mother’s lives too.

In June, I visited the Buguruni Health Center in Tanzania, and there I met a woman living with HIV who had recently given birth to a baby boy.  She had been coming to the clinic throughout her pregnancy for medication and information because she desperately wanted her boy to get a healthy start in life, and most especially, she wanted him to be born HIV-free.  When we met, she had just received the best news she could have hoped for.  Her son did not have the virus.  And thanks to the treatment she was getting there, she would live to see him grow up.

This is what American leadership and shared responsibility can accomplish for all mothers and children.  The world already has the necessary tools and knowledge.  Last year alone, PEPFAR helped prevent 114,000 babies from being born with HIV.  Now, we have a way forward too.  PEPFAR and UNAIDS have brought together key partners to launch a global plan for eliminating new infections among children by 2015.  And we continue to integrate prevention and treatment efforts with broader health programs, which not only prevents HIV infections, but also keeps children healthy and helps mothers give birth safely.

In addition to preventing mother-to-child transmission, an effective combination prevention strategy has to include voluntary medical male circumcision.  In the past few years, research has proven that this low-cost procedure reduces the risk of female-to-male transmission by more than 60 percent, and that the benefit is life-long.   

Since 2007, some 1,000,000 men around the world have been circumcised for HIV prevention.  Three fourths of these procedures have been funded by PEPFAR.  In Kenya and Tanzania alone, during special campaigns, clinicians perform more than 35,000 circumcisions a month.

In the fight against AIDS, the ideal intervention is one that prevents people from being infected in the first place, and the two methods I’ve described – mother-to-child transmission, voluntary medical male circumcision – are the most cost-effective interventions we have, and we are scaling them up.  But even once people do become HIV-positive, we can still make it far less likely that they will transmit the virus to others by treating them with the antiretroviral drugs.  So this is the third element of combination prevention that I want to mention.

Thanks to U.S. Government-funded research published just a few months ago, we now know that if you treat a person living with HIV effectively, you reduce the risk of transmission to a partner by 96 percent. 

Of course, not everyone takes the medication exactly as directed, and so some people may not get the maximum level of protection.  But even so, this new funding will have a profound impact on the fight against AIDS. 

For years, some have feared that scaling up treatment would detract from prevention efforts.   Now we know beyond a doubt if we take a comprehensive view of our approach to the pandemic, treatment doesn’t take away from prevention.  It adds to prevention.  So let’s end the old debate over treatment versus prevention and embrace treatment as prevention. 

There’s no question that scaling up treatment is expensive.  But thanks to lower costs of drugs, bulk purchasing, and simple changes like shipping medication by ground instead of air, we and our partners are reducing the cost of treatment.  In 2004, the cost to PEPFAR for providing ARVs and services to one patient averaged nearly $1,100 a year. Today, it’s $335 and falling.  Continuing to drive down these costs is a challenge for all of us, from donors and developing countries to institutions like the Global Fund.

Treating HIV-positive people before they become ill also has indirect economic benefits.  It allows them to work, to support their families, contribute to their communities.  It averts social costs, such as caring for orphans whose parents die of AIDS-related illnesses.  A study published just last month weighed the costs and benefits and found that – I quote – “the economic benefits of treatment will substantially offset, and likely exceed, program costs within 10 years of investment.”  In other words, treating people will not only save lives, it will generate considerable economic returns as well.  

Now, some people have concerns about treatment as prevention.  They argue that many people transmit the virus to others shortly after they have acquired it themselves, but before they have begun treatment.  That is a legitimate concern, and we are studying ways to identify people sooner after transmission and help them avoid spreading the virus further.  But to make a big dent in this pandemic, we don’t need to be able to identify and treat everyone as soon as they are HIV-positive.  In places where the pandemic is well established, as it is in most of Sub-Saharan African countries, most transmissions come not from people who are newly infected, but from people with longstanding HIV infections who need treatment now or soon will.   We already have the tests we need to identify these people.  If they receive and maintain their treatment, their health will improve dramatically, and they will be far less likely to transmit the virus to their partners.  

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  comments 1 - 2 (of 2 total)    

Eddie m, Blantyre, 2011-11-11 05:32:21
I am a MALAWIAN who is hiv positive,i am grateful to the American people and their dollars for the massive support,however i would appreciate if you would attach strict conditions to avoid corrupt govt officials from enriching themselves at our expense

Richard McCormick, Redwood City, 2011-11-10 13:00:12
What the HELL does "Voluntary Male Circumcision" have to do with HIV AIDS?? Seriously??

comments 1 - 2 (of 2 total)    


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