Lipoatrophy : The Latest on “Lipo” - by David Evans

POZ - Health, Life and HIV
Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
E-newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:
POZ Focus

Back to home » HIV 101 » POZ Focus » Lipoatrophy

Table of Contents

 
Saving Face—and Arms and Legs

The Latest on “Lipo”

Fat Facts

The Lipo-Med Link

Looking for Lipo

About Face

Willing to Experiment

Looking At Options

Click here to download
a copy of Lipoatrophy
(Nov. 07).


What You're Talking About
Gay-on-Gay Shaming: The New HIV War (blog) (47 comments)

'Undetectable' Is the New 'Negative'? (29 comments)

I am not a criminal. I am not a sex offender. I'm a survivor! (blog) (15 comments)

Will HIV Ever Be Safe Enough for You? (blog) (13 comments)

Donald Sterling Claims Magic Johnson Not a 'Good Example' (9 comments)

Media Cooks Up Claim That Soy Sauce Treats, Even Cures HIV (7 comments)
Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


emailprint

The Latest on “Lipo”

by David Evans

Some lose fat and some gain it. But only lipoatrophy has been linked to HIV and its meds.

Lipoatrophy (fat loss) is one set of symptoms that fall under the catch-all term lipodystrophy. Lipoatrophy refers to a loss of body fat, notably in the limbs, whereas lipodystrophy also describes a buildup of fat deep within the body and unhealthy changes to fats and sugar in the blood. Initially experts thought that all of these symptoms were connected. But in recent years research has shown that it is more likely that they’re unique syndromes with different causes.

According to the large, ongoing Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM) study, which started in 2000, the increase in fat in the belly and elsewhere in the body, dubbed lipohypertrophy, appears to be associated far more with age and lifestyle factors than with HIV infection or the drugs used to treat it. Lipoatrophy, however, was concluded to be a genuine HIV-related problem as it occurred much more frequently in HIV-positive than HIV-negative study volunteers.



Scroll down to comment on this story.




Name:

(will display; 2-50 characters)

Email:

(will NOT display)

City:

(will display; optional)

Comment (500 characters left):

(Note: The POZ team reviews all comments before they are posted. Please do not include either ":" or "@" in your comment. The opinions expressed by people providing comments are theirs alone. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Smart + Strong, which is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by people providing comments.)

Comments require captcha.
Please enter this number for verification:

| Posting Rules



Hide comments

Previous Comments:


         

[ Go to top ]

Join POZ Facebook Twitter Google+ MySpace YouTube Tumblr Flickr
Quick Links
Current Issue

HIV Testing
Safer Sex
Find a Date
Newly Diagnosed
HIV 101
Disclosing Your Status
Starting Treatment
Help Paying for Meds
Search for the Cure
POZ Stories
POZ Opinion
POZ Exclusives
Read the Blogs
Visit the Forums
Job Listings
Events Calendar


    dlw8585
    Fort Lauderdale
    Florida


    slimcuteguy
    Asheville
    North Carolina


    usuallyhappy
    Palm Springs
    California


    jacob2608
    Panama City Beach
    Florida
Click here to join POZ Personals!
Ask POZ Pharmacist

Talk to Us
Poll
Do you work with your doc to design your own treatment regimen?
Yes
No

Survey
PrEP Course

more surveys
Contact Us
We welcome your comments!
[ about Smart + Strong | about POZ | POZ advisory board | partner links | advertising policy | advertise/contact us | site map]
© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy.
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.