January/February #193 : Low Viral Load Still a Threat - by Benjamin Ryan

POZ - Health, Life and HIV
Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
E-newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:

Back to home » Archives » POZ Magazine issues




Table of Contents
 

Features

Body Counts

Faith, Hope and Charity

From the Editor

Houses of the Holy

Feedback

Letters-January/February 2014

The POZ Q+A

Sister Solidarity

POZ Planet

Like a Prayer

More Gay Couples Can Test Together

Poz Stories: Erin Gingrich

Status Symbols

The AIDS Walk, with a Cane and Cameras

Out in the Open

Oh Baby, Baby!

Voices

Remembering Dennis Daniel

Care and Treatment

Glowing Reports on Global AIDS

Red States Say No to Medicaid Expansion

New HIV Replication Pathway Discovered

Low Viral Load Still a Threat

Cocaine Fuels HIV

Research Notes

Prevention: Possible Microbicide Tricks HIV

Treatment: Antifungal Agent Fights HIV

Cure: CCR5 Gene Therapy Milestone

Concerns: Worse Outcomes From Multiple Clinics

POZ Heroes

Tough Love

   
Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


email print

January / February 2014

Low Viral Load Still a Threat

by Benjamin Ryan

HIV-positive people taking antiretrovirals who have an ongoing detectable viral load may be at a raised risk for treatment failure even when the levels are as low as 50 to 199. U.S. treatment guidelines state that there is no evidence that this viral load range poses such a risk. But a recent Canadian study found that the 50 to 199 window slightly more than doubles the risk of treatment failure when compared with undetectable viral loads. (Standard viral load tests cannot detect levels below 50.)

Claudie Laprise, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the division of cancer epidemiology at McGill University in Montreal, who led the study while at the Université de Montréal, says that much more research is needed to confirm her findings. And while acknowledging that “there are a lot of clinical factors to consider before changing” HIV medications, she says that physicians should still consider low-level viral replication as part of the overall risk of potential treatment failure and include the factor in their clinical decision making.

Search: viral load, research, medication

Scroll down to comment on this story.



Name:

(will display; 2-50 characters)

Email:

(will NOT display)

City:

(will display; optional)

Comment (500 characters left):

(Note: The POZ team reviews all comments before they are posted. Please do not include either ":" or "@" in your comment. The opinions expressed by people providing comments are theirs alone. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Smart + Strong, which is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by people providing comments.)

Comments require captcha.
Please enter this number for verification:

| Posting Rules



Show comments (0 total)

 
[Go to top]

Join POZ Facebook Twitter Google+ MySpace YouTube Tumblr Flickr
Quick Links
Current Issue

HIV Testing
Safer Sex
Find a Date
Newly Diagnosed
HIV 101
Disclosing Your Status
Starting Treatment
Help Paying for Meds
Search for the Cure
POZ Stories
POZ Opinion
POZ Exclusives
Read the Blogs
Visit the Forums
Job Listings
Events Calendar


    fokisi
    Long Beach
    California


    InDefaultOf
    Seattle
    Washington


    Fred9774
    Brooklyn
    New York

This could be you!
Click here to join POZ Personals!
Ask POZ Pharmacist

Talk to Us
Poll
Will decriminalizing injection drug use help end the global HIV epidemic?
Yes
No

Survey
PrEP Course

more surveys
Contact Us
We welcome your comments!
[ about Smart + Strong | about POZ | POZ advisory board | partner links | advertising policy | advertise/contact us | site map]
© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy.
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.