September #157 : Mother Plus Child Minus HIV - by Oriol R. Gutierrez Jr.

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Table of Contents
 

Mother Plus Child Minus HIV

Keeping AIDS at Bay in Cuba




Breathe Easy

Shelf Life

Our Positive Bodies, Ourselves

Med Alert

Breathe Easy

Red Eye?

Freeze!

You Said It

Two Therapies for Belly Fat

This Pricks Our Interest

Our Cup of Tea

Aquamid—A New Facial Filler

Filling in Your Life’s Outline




Lost in Translation

The Giving Tree

Don’t Believe the Hype

Tea Time

And—Action!

Unsetting the Mind




Your Feedback-September 2009

Editor's Letter-September 2009

Curtains Up

GMHC Treatment Issues-September 2009



 
Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


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September 2009


Mother Plus Child Minus HIV

by Oriol R. Gutierrez Jr.

Diagnosed with HIV in 2004, Luz de Jesus Roman knows all too well that HIV disproportionately affects Latinas. Having recently given birth to a healthy HIV-negative baby girl, Luz also knows that motherhood is a real option for HIV-positive women.

Born in Puerto Rico in 1969 and a resident of The Bronx, New York, since 1999, Luz de Jesus Roman lives in two worlds: her Spanish-speaking world and her English-speaking world, which often collide. As a mother, a wife, a daughter and a person living with HIV, Luz struggles to bridge her different realities and to fight HIV while raising her family.

Luz was diagnosed with HIV in 2004. She became a widow in 2005 when her first husband, who was HIV positive, passed away only months after her diagnosis. He was the father of her first four children, who are all HIV negative. Luz remarried in 2006 and decided to have a baby. On  October 21, 2008, Luz gave birth to Janel, a healthy baby girl who has since tested negative for HIV.

As a Latina, Luz unfortunately isn’t alone in her struggle against HIV/AIDS. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Latinos represented 15 percent of the U.S. population in 2006, but they comprised 17 percent of all new domestic HIV infections. And Latinas represented 15 percent of all females living with HIV/AIDS in the United States.

Janel is a beautiful reminder that motherhood is indeed a real option for HIV-positive women. Under the supervision of a physician, an HIV-positive woman taking the proper HIV medications and other precautions (such as cesarean sections for women with high viral loads) can reduce the rate of transmission of the virus to her baby to 2 percent or less, according to the CDC.

We chatted with Luz shortly after she got the happy news that Janel was HIV-free.

How did you find out you were HIV positive?
It was a routine test. The [HIV counselor] put the results in front of me. When I looked at it, it said positive. I got up and hugged her, and I said I’m scared for my kids. I was in a state of disbelief. [My first husband] was diagnosed [with HIV] in 2000. I started testing every three months, and it was always negative. There were a lot of ups and downs [in our marriage]. There wasn’t a lot of communication. I thought because it’s once in a while [that we don’t use protection], I’m not going to get it. I was wrong.

How did you initially deal with your HIV diagnosis?
I cried like a baby the first night. I was in the bathroom, and I remember just letting it all out. [Two days after I found out that I was HIV positive] I participated in the morning meetings [of a support group for people with HIV/AIDS in New York City]. It was uplifting. I became a real woman in that place.

I was terrified about people finding out, especially my family, because of the stigma. [For example,] there was this guy who used to work with my dad [in Puerto Rico], and he was HIV positive. I was about 18 years old at the time, and I didn’t know anything about HIV/AIDS. My dad cooked [for him], and the guy was eating [off of my dad’s utensils]. I thought my father was crazy, because I’m thinking you can get HIV from using the same spoon. Now, I know that’s not true.

How did you cope with becoming a widow only months after your HIV diagnosis?
[My first husband] had hepatitis C before he was HIV positive. He wasn’t taking care of himself [the last months of his life]. I found out I was HIV positive in August 2004, and I became a widow in February 2005. It was like a roller coaster.

I just tried to keep it together because my whole family was hysterical. But God gives you what you can handle, not more. [My first husband and I] had a relationship that wasn’t great, but we had four beautiful children. I’m HIV positive, but today I’m happily married and have a beautiful baby girl.

Please tell us more about your new baby, Janel.
[My second husband and I] were waiting for the train one day, and I said, “Let’s have a baby!” I started doing research on HIV medicines [to prevent transmission of the virus to my baby]. I had had four cesarean sections, so the doctor said it’s the best thing for me to have one again. I had an IUD, and had to get it removed. During the time that I was trying to conceive, we didn’t use protection, but after we had the baby we used protection again. It was nerve-racking during the months they test the baby [repeatedly] for HIV. In 2009 I got the final phone call saying she’s negative. If my baby would have been HIV positive, I would have been crushed.

As a Latina, why is it important for you to be open about your HIV status?
Because I think we still don’t have a face out there representing Latino people. Magic Johnson represents black people, but he was famous before he became positive. We need real people. I’m low-income. I’m a homemaker. I live a normal everyday life. We need people like me.

Why should people get tested for HIV?
If people get tested and they they have HIV, they can start using protection. Do the right thing, be smart, get educated. Don’t be afraid. People make it bigger than what it is—it’s just a virus. [Knowing your status means] you can prevent other people from getting infected. Not only that, [by knowing your status and not passing it on to others] you are protecting your family. If we continue to pass this on, it’s going to stay with us forever. It’s going to be out there, and who’s to say tomorrow your daughter or son is not going to get it from somebody else because the vicious cycle continues.  

Why should people disclose their HIV status?
In the long run, [not disclosing will] affect them emotionally and physically; it does take a toll. It’s draining; you don’t need to carry that. You don’t need to be ashamed; there’s nothing wrong with [having HIV]. Why should I be ashamed? It’s who I am, this is me. You accept me for who I am, and if you don’t it’s your loss.

Why did you disclose your HIV status to your family?
For the past five years, I told a few very select group of people, and I felt confined. I felt that I couldn’t do as much and as many things as I know now that I can do. It was about time. I think it wasn’t fair that for so long I kept it to myself. I always say you don’t know how long you have, so I want to make every moment count.

How did you disclose your HIV status to your family?
It was a very slow process [to tell most of my family]. I made a lot of mistakes in the beginning with my children. [I talked to the older ones at first too bluntly,] which was ignorant on my part because you don’t say it like that to children. I learned, and then I went to them in a different way.

They were already more understanding because they knew about their father [being HIV positive]. They took it well, the second time around. I told my youngest son recently. We went into the details about the virus and how to handle it if people are being mean. I coached him not to be afraid.

I told my aunt and my brother right away. When I disclosed to my mother, I was actually scared because I thought that she wasn’t going to take it well. I said, “How would you feel if I told you I was HIV positive?” She said, “I would not feel good because you are my daughter and I cannot get you cured.” I said, “I’m positive.” She just kept saying, “But you had the baby.” I explained to her that I took medicine and the baby is negative. Then she said, “Que bueno.” [“How good.”] You know those moments when you want to sing? It was a healing moment for me.

Do you have any advice for HIV-positive women who want to be mothers?
No matter what people say, believe in who you are inside and follow your heart. We all have what it takes. If you’re thinking about getting pregnant and you’re not on HIV medication, get on medication. If you’re on HIV medication, do some research because there are some medications that aren’t good for the baby. The most important thing is that you take care of yourself so that the baby is healthy. I think it’s our responsibility to protect our children.

It happened for me, and it can happen for you. My baby is the best thing that ever happened to me. If she would have been positive, I guess I would have had to deal with it. But I’m glad I took the necessary steps for her to be safe.

Search: Luz de Jesus Roman, mother-to-child transmission, family


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  comments 1 - 15 (of 30 total)     next > >>

Edward Kabaso Ng'uni, Siavonga,Zambia, 2010-09-25 16:42:52
Luz, this is a good and inspiring testimony. For sure my wife and I were diagonised HIV+ in 2006 when she was already pregnant. We were placed on ART and my wife underwent Caeserian section with the blessing of baby boy. He has repeatedly tested Negative to HIV and is turning 3 yrs on 29 Sept 2010. Thank God for the support we are getting from the American people on HIV meds. Keep it up my sister u are not alone.

Luz, BRONX, N.Y., 2010-04-19 11:16:22
HEY IT'S ME LUZ! THANK U ALL 4 BEING REAL EVEN IF DNT AGREE. MY HEART WAS IN THE RIGHT PLACE.THE LORD KEEPS GUIDING ME AND GIVES ME STRENGHT.I KNOW WHO I AM AND NEED NO APROVAL TO JUSTIFY MY SELF. IS THOSE WHO ARE ENCOURAGED AND BLESSED WHO KEEP PUSHING ME TO STAND 4 ME!I STAND BEHIND MY LIFE DECISIONS FULLY! LIKE IT OR NOT IS GOD WHO IS GLORIFIED . HE AND ONLY HIM CAN JUDGE ME. I THANK HIM EVERYDAY FOR THE PRIVILEGE AND FOR THE BRAVE SOULS OF ALL OU YOU. BELIEVE!! Y ADELANTE SIEMPRE ADELANTE!!!

Ida Rivera, Kissimmee, 2009-11-06 16:56:03
I would just like to tell Luz that it is a blessing to have a baby born & be negative I was diagnosed in July 1990 when I was 7 months pregnant with my son who pasted away 23 months later but god had other plans for me I have been positive for 20yrs. & I also had a baby while being HIV I was one of the first on the protocol in 1995 in Orl. Fl.my daughter was born 9lbs. 13oz. 21 & a half in. and I had a vaginal delivery she went thru all that poking of needles but she is a healthy 14 yr old.

LOVELY1980, HOUSTON, 2009-10-08 04:37:59
I SEE THAT THERE'S MANY PEOPLE ARE STILL UNEDUCATED ABOUT HIV AND AIDS. I BEEN HIV POSITIVE FOR 3 YEARS AND IF YOU SEE ME YOU WONT EVEN HAVE A CLUE. IM VERY ATTRACTIVE , IN GREAT SHAPE, EDUCATED, I NEVER WAS PROMISCIOUS, NO DRUGS,NO PROSTITUTION AT ALL. I WAS WITH THIS GUY I DATED FOR TWO YEARS AND WE HAVE PROTECTED SEX BUT THERE'S A TIME WHEN YOU DECIDES NOT TO PUT ON A CONDOM. HE'S BEEN HIV POSITVE TWO YEARS BEFROE HE MET ME AND HE NEVER TOLD ME HE WAS + SO PLEASE PEOPLE STOP JUDGING!

brentsf, San Francisco, 2009-10-06 12:01:48
Luz's decision was her own and is one that is quite common. When health organizations say the risk is 1 in 200 or 500 we tend to think "it won't happen to me". Playing the odds we can and do sometimes lose. I commend her for her decision to come out about her story. Telling your story is the most effective way to prevent new HIV infections because it puts a face and a heart to information people only read on billboards. To Oscar, Yes, you could father a child. Google "sperm washing HIV".

Veronica, Miami, 2009-09-30 09:55:26
You are a brave woman, so inspired. No matter how many times I heard about the possibility for a HIV person to have a baby; always is good to hear a new and real history. All the best for you and your children.

Oscar Delgado, key west, 2009-09-25 12:07:37
I am 24 year old male who has just been diagnosed with HIV.... Can I have children in the future without the risk of them being born with the virus?

Dee, , 2009-09-23 08:39:58
I was diagnosed in 1995, and have had 4 healthy kids since then. There is nothing wrong with my own health either, and I've never passed it to either of my husbands. You have to take care of yourself, but it's certainly nothing to freak out about.

kenyan gal, nairobi, 2009-09-17 07:59:17
its good to know that even with hiv we can still live like all the other women out there. am 42 years old and am thinking of having a baby, havent talked to my doctor yet.if anyone out there can assist about the risks due to age,but my cd4 is over 800.

iris, new york, 2009-09-14 00:01:09
Thank you so much for comming out and speaking about this issue. I have been trying for the girl for more than ten years. I have two boys. I thought that my meds were preventing me from getting pregant. But you just gave me hope that I can have a baby.

Missteetee27, Jackson, ms, 2009-09-12 22:29:26
Keep ur head up! You are a true inspiration to me. I have been poz for years and I have came to the point to where I have gave up. I stop taking my med, I drop down to 200 cd4, probably lower than that now. But the more I go to poz and the body and see other people going through the same things I go through, I feel good about my situation. Now I am struggling taking my meds but I am trying, its a one day step. I know where u have been, I have been there, so may God bless u and ur family.

clinton, Ny, 2009-09-09 22:18:46
People are so judgemental-Grow up! At least she researched the information and got extreme care from her doctor! If you're not a woman or man living with the issue-then you cannot speak for our soul! You don't even know what and how we feel. Plus, someone mention GOD! God loves-he doesn't hate! He is the only one who can truly judge a person-and he does it by your heart! MaMa be Blessed with your lovely daughter! Hmp! Seems like the Lord was on your side...because he knows your heart!

angel, NJ, 2009-09-05 08:31:49
As a mother of a (-) child I think this story is wonderful. I found about my status during my 1st trimester and it was emotionally draining. It wasn't until my child was 2 that we were 100% sure she was ok. I could never got pregnant on purpose, it's just 2 risky but 2 each it's own. Options are out there and people should know about them. I do disagree about disclosure... unless we're intimiate or your a dr. treating me... it's not your business. Select friends and family know (period).

Maya, , 2009-09-03 20:30:38
I am an HIV+ woman, I have two beautiful children, neither of which have HIV. Articles like this are good-with proper care and treatment, hiv + women can have children without passing the disease on and can live long enough to grow old and become grandparents. Too many people don't realize this fact.

Jay, New York, 2009-09-03 18:50:58
ok so i was reading what she had to say and i dont think shes wrong the purpose of this was to let people know whats wrong and right. yea she was dumb for having unpretected sex with her 1st husband but shes just making sure others dont make the same mistake

comments 1 - 15 (of 30 total)     next > >>

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