Treatment News : Early, Short Course of HIV Meds for Infants Better Than a Delay

POZ - Health, Life and HIV
Subscribe to:
POZ magazine
E-newsletters
Join POZ: Facebook MySpace Twitter Pinterest
Tumblr Google+ Flickr MySpace
POZ Personals
Sign In / Join
Username:
Password:

Back to home » Treatment News » September 2013

Most Popular Links
Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV

15 Years Ago In POZ


More Treatment News

Click here for more news

Have news about HIV? Send press releases, news tips and other announcements to news@poz.com.


emailprint

September 13, 2013

Early, Short Course of HIV Meds for Infants Better Than a Delay

For HIV-positive newborns, immediate treatment followed by a treatment interruption provides better results than waiting until the immune system deteriorates to begin antiretrovirals, MedPage Today reports. Publishing their findings in the Lancet, researchers began a study in 2005, called the CHER trial, of 377 HIV-positive children between 6 and 12 weeks old in South Africa. This report marks the five-year results.

The children were randomly dived into three groups: Two of them received immediate protease inhibitor–based therapy for either 40 or 96 weeks, followed by an interruption in treatment, and the third received the PI-based drug regimen after they displayed evidence of illness or a depleted immune system.

On average, those who received delayed treatment needed to begin lifelong treatment 20 weeks after they were randomized in the trial. The 40-week treatment group needed to re-start therapy 33 weeks after the treatment interruption. Those in the 96-week group were able to put off re-starting treatment by 70 weeks.

At the trial’s end, 24 of the children (19 percent) who were in the 40-week group and 40 (32 percent) of those in the 96-week group were able to remain off treatment. The group that delayed treatment had a higher number of deaths and visits to the hospital, and their treatment proved more expensive than those in the other two groups.

To read a release on the study, click here.

To read the MedPage Today story, click here.

To read the Lancet article, click here.

Search: HIV, newborn, infant, treatment interruption, early treatment, antiretrovirals, CHER trial, MedPage Today.


Scroll down to comment on this story.



Name:

(will display; 2-50 characters)

Email:

(will NOT display)

City:

(will display; optional)

Comment (500 characters left):

(Note: The POZ team reviews all comments before they are posted. Please do not include either ":" or "@" in your comment. The opinions expressed by people providing comments are theirs alone. They do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Smart + Strong, which is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied by people providing comments.)

Comments require captcha.
Please enter this number for verification:

| Posting Rules



Hide comments

Previous Comments:


  comments 1 - 1 (of 1 total)    

Really?, Orange, 2013-09-13 21:21:02
Why are we wasting money on research that's common sense? Who is funding this? Why isn't this money being made available to more useful endeavors like, oh I don't know, a cure?!?! Or perhaps more medications?!?! Or maybe putting that money towards those who can't afford their medication?

comments 1 - 1 (of 1 total)    


[Go to top]


Join POZ Facebook Twitter Google+ MySpace YouTube Tumblr Flickr
Quick Links
Current Issue

HIV 101
HIV Testing
Safer Sex
Find a Date
Newly Diagnosed
Disclosing Your Status
Starting Treatment
Search for the Cure
POZ Stories
POZ TV
Read the Blogs
Visit the Forums
Women
African American
Latino
Providers
Job Listings
Events Calendar


    acousticmat
    Oakland
    California


    Newhopenate
    New Hope
    Pennsylvania


    Sexynyrican
    Brooklyn
    New York


    albsur7436
    San Francisco
    California
Click here to join POZ Personals!
Ask POZ Pharmacist

Talk to Us
Poll
Do you enjoy books with HIV-positive characters?
Yes
No

Survey
Mind Matters

more surveys
Contact Us
We welcome your comments!
[ about Smart + Strong | about POZ | POZ advisory board | partner links | advertising policy | advertise/contact us | site map]
© 2014 Smart + Strong. All Rights Reserved. Terms of use and Your privacy.
Smart + Strong® is a registered trademark of CDM Publishing, LLC.