March #186 : See You in Six Months? - by Benjamin Ryan

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Table of Contents
 

Features

Achieving the End

Falling Through the Cracks

From the Editor

Let's Stay Together

Feedback

Letters-March 2013

The POZ Q+A

Opening New Doors

POZ Planet

Turn Up the Music

Bookmarks

Country Remedy

Promoting PrEP

Native Talents

Bare Facts

All Dolled Up

Tickled Pink

Voices

The 360 Approach

Care and Treatment

See You in Six Months?

Studying Risk Factors for Mental Decline

Implementing Health Care Reform

Pregnant Women Struggling With Adherence

GMHC Treatment Issues March 2013

HPV Vaccine May Benefit Women With HIV

Research Notes

Prevention: Latino Epidemic Varies by Region

Treatment: Atripla vs. Stribild and Complera

Cure: A Cat-and-Mouse Vaccine Game

Concerns: Ex-Inmates Aren’t Retained in Care

POZ Survey Says

Listen to Your Heart

POZ Heroes

Farewell, Friend

   
Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


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March 2013

See You in Six Months?

by Benjamin Ryan

If you have an undetectable viral load, it’s possible that you might need to see the doctor only twice a year—saving money, time and hassle. A recent study analyzed a group of 2,171 HIV-positive people with undetectable viral loads over the course of a year as the participants went in for checkups every three, four or six months. About three quarters of each group maintained full control of the virus.

“We certainly don’t want our study to be making a blanket statement that every patient who has an undetectable viral load can certainly be seen every six months,” says lead researcher April Buscher, MD, an attending physician at Durham VA Medical Center in North Carolina, who conducted the research while she was a resident fellow at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and announced her findings at the IDWeek 2012 meting in San Diego. “We’re just trying to start the conversations about getting clinicians to think of some patients who may not have to be seen every three months, or even every four months, that there very well may be patients who are appropriate to be seen every six months.”

One thing that’s clearly important: keeping appointments. The study found that those who canceled were more likely to develop a detectable viral load

Search: HIV, positive people, appointments, undetectable viral load

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