December #140 : Yesterday Once More - by Kellee Terrell

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Table of Contents
 

Precious Stone

More Than Just a Number




Dodging Danger

Northern Disclosure

Ask For It By Name

Learning Latex

Yule Love ’Em

Catch of the Month

Cash Therapy

A Wealth of Trouble

Think Inside the Box

Baby Bonus

New Resistance Fighters




African in America

Windy City Blues

Unfine China

It’s a Wrap

Hot Dates-December 2007

Wake Up, India

Survey Says...

Clean Sweep

Look Elsewhere

Yesterday Once More

A Day Without “Day Without Art”

Medicine Man

Suspicious Minds




Editor's Letter-December 2007

Mailbox-December 2007



 
Most Popular Lessons

The HIV Life Cycle

Shingles

Herpes Simplex Virus

Syphilis & Neurosyphilis

Treatments for Opportunistic Infections (OIs)

What is AIDS & HIV?

Hepatitis & HIV


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December 2007


Yesterday Once More

by Kellee Terrell

Dusting off essential AIDS fiction

British English professor Richard Canning’s anthology Vital Signs: Essential AIDS Fiction ($16, Avalon Publishing Group) rediscovers 18 gems from the era of early AIDS. The tales transport readers to the ’80s and mid ’90s—when “manageable disease” was not part of the AIDS lexicon. With such heavyweight writers as Andrew Holleran and Dale Peck, Vital Signs is required reading, especially for the growing younger generation of newly infected. Still, we had a question or two for the professor.

POZ: Might readers associate Vital Signs with death?

Richard Canning: Fear, death and darkness were all part of this period and this collection, but those are not the only things on the table. These stories are also uplifting and vibrant and really illuminate life.

POZ: Why fiction and not real-life stories?
 
Canning: With memoir there can be a duty [to be] appropriate, particularly if there’s a memorial aspect—which in the early years, invariably there was. But fiction, although very close to real life, is pure imagination and can dare a lot of things that nonfiction cannot.


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