Selling liquor on Sundays, however, would remain unjustifiable

State Representative Roy Brun tried to introduce a bill to the Louisiana legislature to legalize the "justifiable homicide" of HIV positive people who "pose a threat to others." The outraged reactions he received caused a surprised Brun to withdraw the bill.

Sounds like Mel Gibson has his next script

Hoping to exploit homophobia and AIDSphobia among members of the jury, laywers defended Marvin McClendon's brutal murder of two gay men on the basis that the victims' HIV status was equivalent to a "loaded weapon" in the hands of two "dangerous sexual predators." Although McClendon was essentially convicted, the judge issued an unprecedented ruling that HIV tests performed on the bodies of the two men could be considered admissible evidence.

Only because Dorothy and Toto had such a beautiful thing going

When a Kansas bill mandating abstinence-only sex education in schools passed out of commmittee, it not only required that students be taught condoms don't work, it further demanded that the state sodomy law be read aloud. Although the bulk of the bill passed through the state's House, the spicy reading—which mentioned homosexuality and bestiality in the same breath—was dropped.

And the state could raise the money by renting the mailing list!

The California Medical Association voted to ask for state legislation requiring that anyone testing positive be reported to county health officials "for the purpose of partner notification and disease control."

And what's your point?

An amendment tied to the U.S. Defense Department's 1996 budget requires all military branches to discharge personnel within six months if they test positive for HIV. Mad-dog GOP Rep. Bob Dornan, who backed the bill, said, "If the only way that HIV could be transmitted was through heterosexuals visiting off-limits bordellos or through intravenous drug use, I doubt that the Times or anyone else would oppose the discharge of HIV-infected service members."