Pop divas Lady Gaga and Cyndi Lauper are the faces of From Our Lips, which is M·A·C Cosmetics' Viva Glam campaign honoring women living with HIV/AIDS and those working to prevent new infections. All proceeds from sales of Viva Glam Cyndi (a light coral red lipstick) and Viva Glam Gaga (a light blue-pink lipstick) will benefit the M·A·C AIDS Fund. To date, the fund has raised more than $150 million to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS and improve the lives of HIV-positive people worldwide.

“I've been familiar with the campaign and have been wearing M·A·C since I was 10 years old,” Gaga said in a statement. “To be joining the likes of iconic former Viva Glam spokespeople is an honor. My new Viva Glam lipstick color is amazing. It's very me—a bluish pink, great for everyday, a little bit '80s. I hope that women buy this lipstick, and honor themselves and honor the cause.”

As part of this new Viva Glam women's initiative, the M·A·C AIDS Fund will distribute $2.5 million in new donations to fund programs that address gender inequalities, domestic violence, discrimination and other vulnerabilities that put women at risk for HIV.

“We're raising the Viva Glam bar this year with the voices of two incredible artists,” said John Demsey, group president of Estee Lauder Companies and Chairman of the M·A·C AIDS Fund. “Lady Gaga and Cyndi Lauper are bringing women's issues to the forefront of the HIV/AIDS crisis. We have one artist that hit the music industry at the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, and another that is explosively popular with young people today. They represent different generations that are equally as affected by this disease, and both are helping to spread the message of the power of one lipstick.”

In conjunction with the launch of From Our Lips, the M·A·C AIDS Fund released data from nationwide surveys on women and HIV. According to the M·A·C survey results, nearly three in five American women (55 percent) say they've never been tested for HIV, and 78 percent say they've had sexual intercourse without a condom. In addition, the average woman was last tested for HIV three years ago, compared to two years for the average man.