Despite overwhelming scientific findings, some people remain convinced that HIV doesn't cause AIDS and that antiretrovirals are toxic poisons. Led by vocal skeptics such as former South African President Thabo Mbeki and the late Christine Maggiore, AIDS denialism continues to flourish, especially with the help of the Internet.

To counter this strengthening movement, Seth Kalichman, PhD, a social psychology professor at the University of Connecticut, wrote Denying AIDS: Conspiracy Theories, Pseudoscience, and Human Tragedy ($25, Copernicus Books), which examines AIDS denialism's origin, agendas and potentially damaging influence on HIV prevention and treatment.

Kalichman believes that the scientific community's decision to stay quiet over the years has only fueled the denialists' power. “[For too long] scientists have believed that if you ignore the denialists, they will go away,” he told POZ. “The HIV community really has a role in combating this misinformation.”  
                     
All royalties will help the Family Treatment Fund provide AIDS meds for people living with HIV/AIDS in Africa.