AIDS is an everyday experience. The dates on this calendar all relate to the AIDS crisis. Some are globally known; others are drawn from personal experiences.

This online calendar is produced in partnership with Visual AIDS and is an extension of the exhibition “EVERYDAY,” which was curated by Jean Carlomusto, Alexandra Juhasz and Hugh Ryan in 2016. The exhibition and accompanying print calendar explored the AIDS crisis—historically and currently—through the lens of art and ephemera that examines and evidences daily experiences and practices in response to HIV/AIDS. Artists featured in the “EVERYDAY” exhibition were invited to submit as many dates to the calendar as they desired.

We invite you to reflect upon these dates, and this artwork, in dialogue with one another. We also encourage you to submit dates of your own by clicking here. Submissions may include the date of your diagnosis, the date of the loss of a loved one to AIDS-related illness or a significant milestone in your life with HIV/AIDS.

New submissions will be continually added to the calendar because AIDS is not over.

SEPTEMBER 1

Chloe Dzubilo is the first transgender person on the cover of POZ magazine. (2002)

Paul Chisolm leaves longterm serodiscordant relationship.

SEPTEMBER 2

 

SEPTEMBER 3

Grahame Perry’s ashes scattered by loved ones in the San Francisco Bay. (2016)

SEPTEMBER 4

SEPTEMBER 5

Activists put a giant condom over Senator Jesse Helms’s house. (1991)

SEPTEMBER 6

Grahame Perry comes out to his sister. (1981)

Visiting Desire, film featuring Chloe Dzubilo, premieres at the Toronto International Film Festival. (1996)

SEPTEMBER 7

 

SEPTEMBER 8

 

SEPTEMBER 9

The CDC identifies all major routes of HIV transmission—and rules out transmission by casual contact, food, water, air, or environmental surfaces. (1983)

SEPTEMBER 10

 

SEPTEMBER 11

Color Dot Connect: Curtis Carman and John Hanning exhibit presented by Visual AIDS opens at Mixed Greens gallery. (2014)

SEPTEMBER 12

The PWA Housing Committee organizes a demonstration to make AIDS housing an issue in New York City Council elections. (1993)

SEPTEMBER 13

 

SEPTEMBER 14

ACT UP’s Sell Welcome action at the New York Stock Exchange stops all trading for an unprecedented 30 minutes. (1989)

SEPTEMBER 15

 

SEPTEMBER 16

ACT UP NY joins ACT UP Long Island in a demonstration protesting the lack of AIDS housing on Long Island. (1989)

SEPTEMBER 17

President Ronald Reagan mentions AIDS publicly for the first time in a speech. (1985)

SEPTEMBER 18

National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day

SEPTEMBER 19

Sweden becomes the first country to meet the UN 90-90-90 goal (90% of people living with HIV know their status, 90% of them are on sustained treatment, and 90% of those people achieve viral suppression). (2016)

SEPTEMBER 20

 

SEPTEMBER 21

 

SEPTEMBER 22

Social media campaign “A Day With HIV In America” invites HIV-positive people to share images of their lives online. (2016)

SEPTEMBER 23

REPEAL Act proposes a review of all laws, policies, and regulations regarding criminal prosecution for HIV-related offenses in U.S. (2011)

SEPTEMBER 24

The Centers for Disease Control uses the term “AIDS” (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) for the first time. (1982)

SEPTEMBER 25

Artist and filmmaker Jack Smith dies of AIDS-related complications. (1989)

SEPTEMBER 26

Visual AIDS launches DUETS: Stephen Andrews and Gregg Bordowitz In Conversation. (2014)

SEPTEMBER 27

National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

SEPTEMBER 28

 

SEPTEMBER 29

 

SEPTEMBER 30

New York’s Attorney General and Lambda Legal file the first AIDS discrimination lawsuit. (1983)

Senate Bill 1007 Mandatory Testing of Prostitutes was signed into law in California. (1988)


About the Artwork

Randy “freedom clay” Rogers, We Are All the Face of HIV/AIDS, 2012, Acrylic on canvas

In the midst of the global pandemic of HIV/AIDS, I was proud to see community based participatory research done in Durham, NC that methodically brought young Black adults (18-30), community members and social scientists together to have a real conversation about ways to decrease HIV infection via increasing awareness, examining reception and potential engagement in HIV biomedical research in this area of the country. Our attitude about HIV and the people who are disproportionately infected plays a significant role in HIV prevalence and incidence around the world.  We are all the face of HIV and together, we can change the “face” and the “state” of HIV.

—Randy “freedom clay” Rogers

Founded in 1988, Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to raising AIDS awareness and creating dialogue around HIV issues today, by producing and presenting visual art projects, exhibitions, public forums and publications—while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS. Visual AIDS is committed to preserving and honoring the work of artists with HIV/AIDS and the artistic contributions of the AIDS movement.