The United States bookstore features books on how HIV/AIDS affects our country. Books are listed in alphabetical order by title. Click the title to read more about each book. Missing your favorite book? Click here to send us your recommendations.


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Killing Us Quietly: Native Americans and HIV/AIDS
by Irene S. Vernon

Over the past five centuries, waves of diseases have ravaged and sometimes annihilated Native American communities. The latest of these silent killers is HIV/AIDS. The first book to detail the devastating impact of the disease on Native Americans, Killing Us Quietly fully and minutely examines the epidemic and its social and cultural consequences among three groups in three geographical areas. Through a series of personal narratives, the book also vividly conveys the terrible individual and emotional toll the disease is taking on Native lives. Exploring Native urban, reservation, and rural perspectives, as well as the viewpoints of Native gay or bisexual men, women, and youth, this study combines statistics, Native demography and histories, and profiles of Native organizations to provide a broad understanding of HIV/AIDS among Native Americans. The book confronts the unique economic and political circumstances and cultural practices that can encourage the spread of the disease in Native settings. And perhaps most importantly, it discusses prevention strategies and educational resources. A much-needed overview of a national calamity, Killing Us Quietly is an essential resource for Natives and non-Natives alike.

Available at Amazon


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"You're the First One I've Told": New Faces of HIV in the South
by Kathryn Whetten-Goldstein and Trang Quyen Nguyen

Policymakers and medical practitioners face obstacles in providing health care without an understanding of the lives of their clients. Whetten-Goldstein (public policy and community and family medicine, Duke U.) and Nguyen (doctoral student in epidemiology at U. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) present a case study of the lives of 25 rural North Carolinian men and women infected with the human immunodeficiency virus that seeks to understand clients' reactions to health policy and institutions. Chapters explore the social and family backgrounds of the participants, examine their reactions to their discover of their HIV positive status, and interrogate the relationship between patients' trust of those in power positions and their interactions with health providers and willingness to take medicines.

Available at Amazon