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Retiring With My HIV

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14 Comments

YYZ Village Guy

(last post) the first ones added to the list when there is a “reduction in force”. For those of us who are still able to work, we will need to upgrade our skills and work longer – and, in my case, longer than I want to – to compensate lower savings while we were in the prime of life and to provide for ourselves in what could be a very long life after we leave the work force.

January 9, 2017 Toronto

YYZ Village Guy

I work in Human Resources and during the bone-crushing recession of the early 1990’s and I learned that employees who don’t maintain their skills are the first ones added to I work in Human Resources and during the bone-crushing recession of the early 1990’s and I learned that employees who don’t maintain their skills are the first ones added the first ones added to the list when there is a “reduction in force”. For those of us who are still able to work, we will need to upgrade our skills contd

January 9, 2017 Toronto

YYz Village Guy

At the same time, we are all – long-term survivors included – will have a much longer life expectancy than our parents, and should be working longer past age 65 to ensure an adequate income for our retirement years. And nobody has a DB pension plan anymore unless you work in an unionized environment or the public sector. contd...

January 9, 2017 Toronto

YYz Village Guy

3/4 I finally bought a condo at age 49, but I will have to work until age 66 to pay it off. What’s the biggest risk that could derail achieving this goal? Ageism – not HIV. The workplace has become a nasty place since the financial crisis, and all employees, regardless of visible or invisible differences, are vulnerable to this prejudice. contd...

January 9, 2017 Toronto

YYZ Village Guy

2/3 because this would be a more liquid asset than real estate in the event that I lost my job (and my LTD benefit) and got sick. Additionally, I developed severe lipodystrophy and I have spent about $30,000 over last ten years for soft tissue fillers; my annual medical bills have ranged from $7,000 - $11,000 (this includes the soft tissue fillers) over the last 10 years.

January 9, 2017 Toronto

YYZ Village Guy

1/2 Like many long-term survivors, my career suffered and I am not in the same financial position as my others in my line of work who have the same age, and have the same education, qualifications, and experience. Diagnosed in 1989, I wasn’t supposed to live past 1992/93; in 1997 my specialist at Toronto general’s immunodeficiency clinic gave me a life expectancy of 5 years.

January 9, 2017 Toronto

POVERTYPOZ

POZ no 21 years, but do to my disability my family set-up a special needs trust, and I also work part-time. I'd look into using an SNT a (blind Trust) as if your situation did change, say AIDS your assets could go into SNT Thanks to supportive parents the SNT has been a life savior, alliowing me a comfortable life on SSDI, part-time job and my monthly dividend check.

January 3, 2017 Manhattan

Michael

In 1985 at 38 I learned that I was HIV+. I had always looked forward to the future, had an IRA and thoughts of old age with my partner sitting on our dock (that we did not have yet) watching cute boys skiing. Fear of death yes, but I wouldn't believe it. That helped me through many horrible situations to still look forward. My fear of being old and sick and poor was worse than any fear of death. It was a motivator to plan my future. At 69, retired for 21 years I am so thankful I didn't give up.

January 3, 2017 DC

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