AIDS is an everyday experience. The dates on this calendar all relate to the AIDS crisis. Some are globally known; others are drawn from personal experiences.

This online calendar is produced in partnership with Visual AIDS and is an extension of the exhibition “EVERYDAY,” which was curated by Jean Carlomusto, Alexandra Juhasz and Hugh Ryan in 2016. The exhibition and accompanying print calendar explored the AIDS crisis—historically and currently—through the lens of art and ephemera that examines and evidences daily experiences and practices in response to HIV/AIDS. Artists featured in the “EVERYDAY” exhibition were invited to submit as many dates to the calendar as they desired.

We invite you to reflect upon these dates, and this artwork, in dialogue with one another. We also encourage you to submit dates of your own by clicking here. Submissions may include the date of your diagnosis, the date of the loss of a loved one to AIDS-related illness or a significant milestone in your life with HIV/AIDS.

New submissions will be continually added to the calendar because AIDS is not over.

JULY 1

The U.S. Public Health Service opens the National AIDS Hotline to respond to public inquiries about the disease. By the end of the month, it receives 8,000 to 10,000 calls daily. (1983)

Tim Bailey Political Funeral organized by the Marys, an ACT UP affinity group, is brought to Washington DC, activists face a stand off with police. (1993)

JULY 2

FDA approves emtricitabine (FTC) brand name Emtriva. (2003)

JULY 3

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The New York Times publishes the first major news story about HIV, “Rare Cancer Seen in 41 Homosexuals,” by Lawrence K. Altman. (1981)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves the first at-home HIV test. It provides results within 40 minutes. (2012)

JULY 4

Terrence Higgins is one of the first people in the United Kingdom to die of AIDS-related causes. His friends create the Terrence Higgins Trust in his honor. Today, it’s the leading HIV and AIDS charity in the U.K. (1982)

Ryan White speaks before 8,400 teachers at the National Education Association convention in New Orleans. (1988)

JULY 5

JULY 6

JULY 7

Justin B. Terry-Smith starts taking HIV medication. (2008)

JULY 8

JULY 9

ACT UP protests for an end to the exclusion of HIV-positive prisoners from the family reunion program. (1991)

JULY 10

A class action suit is filed on HIV-positive prisoners’ behalf by Prisoners Legal Services. (1991)

Barton Lidicé Beneš’ lover, Howard Meyer, dies of AIDS-related complications. (1989)

JULY 11

The XV International AIDS Conference begins in Bangkok, Thailand. (2004)

JULY 12

FDA approves Atripla a combination of efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. (2006)

JULY 13

The National HIV/AIDS Strategy for the United States is first released by the Obama administration. (2010)

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control announce first evidence that antiretroviral drugs can also prevent new infections. (2011)

JULY 14

Elizabeth Glaser and Bob Hattoy are the first people living with HIV to speak at the Democratic National Convention. (1992)

 

JULY 15

JULY 16

Doris Day and Rock Hudson

Rock Hudson appearance at a press conference on Doris Day’s ranch in Carmel, California, became international news due to his gaunt and frail appearance and slurred speech. It was rumored that Hudson had AIDS. (1985)

The Food and Drug Administration announces the approval of Truvada as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). (2012)

JULY 17

Fire in the Belly: The Life and Times of David Wojnarowicz by Cynthia Carr is published. (2012)

Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 is shot down while flying over eastern Ukraine, killing everyone aboard, including six prominent scientists and AIDS activists on their way to the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne. (2014)

JULY 18

A group of minority leaders meets with U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, MD, to discuss concerns about HIV/AIDS in communities of color. The meeting marks the unofficial founding of the National Minority AIDS Council. (1986)

JULY 19

 

JULY 20

 

JULY 21

 

JULY 22

Tim Greathouse art

Tim Greathouse, “David Wojnarowicz, Artist,” 1983, modern gelatin silver print, 14“ by 11”Courtesy of Daniel Cooney Fine Art

Artist and activist David Wojnarowicz dies at age 37. (1992)

The AIDS Memorial Quilt displayed on the National Mall in 2012Oriol Gutierrez

The AIDS Memorial Quilt is displayed in its entirety for the first time since 1996, during the 19th International AIDS Conference in Washington, DC. (2012)

JULY 23

JULY 24

ReMixed Messages exhibition presented by Visual AIDS opens at Fathom Gallery, DC. (2012)

JULY 25

San Francisco General Hospital opens Ward 5B, the first dedicated in-patient AIDS ward in the United States. Within days, all of its 12 beds are occupied. (1983)

A large international study finds evidence that people taking HIV treatment can now expect to live into their 60s and beyond. (2008)

JULY 26

 

JULY 27

The term AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) is proposed to replace GRID (gay-related immune deficiency). (1982)

Luna Luis Ortiz has sex for the first time and becomes HIV positive. (1986).

JULY 28

AIDS Project Los Angeles holds the world’s first AIDS Walk. (1985)

The first annual Last Address Tribute Walk by Visual AIDS is lead by Alex Fialho. (2013)

JULY 29

David Wojnarowicz’s political funeral procession takes place in New York City. (1992)

JULY 30

 

JULY 31


About the Artwork 

Frederick Weston, Sparkling Clean Toilet, 1999, Mixed media collage

Sparkling Clean Toilet speaks to my feelings and concerns about being HIV+.  Am I defying death each day living with the virus, or am I losing my “sparkle?”  If I’m infected, does that mean that I am “unclean?”  Am I spending much of my time in the bathroom on the toilet because of the side effects of the medications, or because the virus is doing a number on my gut?

—Frederick Weston

Founded in 1988, Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to raising AIDS awareness and creating dialogue around HIV issues today, by producing and presenting visual art projects, exhibitions, public forums and publications—while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS. Visual AIDS is committed to preserving and honoring the work of artists with HIV/AIDS and the artistic contributions of the AIDS movement.