AIDS is an everyday experience. The dates on this calendar all relate to the AIDS crisis. Some are globally known; others are drawn from personal experiences.

This online calendar is produced in partnership with Visual AIDS and is an extension of the exhibition “EVERYDAY,” which was curated by Jean Carlomusto, Alexandra Juhasz and Hugh Ryan in 2016. The exhibition and accompanying print calendar explored the AIDS crisis—historically and currently—through the lens of art and ephemera that examines and evidences daily experiences and practices in response to HIV/AIDS. Artists featured in the “EVERYDAY” exhibition were invited to submit as many dates to the calendar as they desired.

We invite you to reflect upon these dates, and this artwork, in dialogue with one another. We also encourage you to submit dates of your own by clicking here. Submissions may include the date of your diagnosis, the date of the loss of a loved one to AIDS-related illness or a significant milestone in your life with HIV/AIDS.

New submissions will be continually added to the calendar because AIDS is not over.

AUGUST 1

Istock

U.S. health officials declare the nation’s blood supply is free of the virus that causes AIDS thanks to a new test that screens out contaminated blood.  (1985)

AUGUST 2

FDA approves Epzicom, a combination of abacavir and lamivudine. (2004)

AUGUST 3

At ACT UP NY, Avram Finkelstein announces the opportunity for a window display at New Museum, eventually titled Let the Record Show. This leads to the formation of the Gran Fury collective. (1987)

AUGUST 4

AUGUST 5

A federal judge orders Florida’s DeSoto County School Board to enroll brothers Ricky, Robert and Randy Ray—all of whom are living with hemophilia and HIV—in school. After the ruling, outraged residents refuse to allow their children to attend school, and on August 28, someone sets fire to the Ray house, destroying it. (1987)

The U.S. Public Health Service recommends that pregnant women be given AZT to reduce the risk of perinatal transmission of HIV. (1994)

Writer Eva Hayward has 8 T-cells. (2010)

AUGUST 6

FDA approves maraviroc (MVC), brand name Selzentry. (2007)

AUGUST 7

HIV writer and activist Justin B. Terry-Smith marries Philip B. Terry-Smith. (2009)

AUGUST 8

Bobbi Campbell, a nurse living with HIV, and his partner, Bobby Hilliard, appear on the cover of Newsweek. (1983)

AUGUST 9

Drug counselor David Purchase sets up the nation’s first needle-exchange program on a sidewalk in Tacoma, Washington. Within five months, he exchanges 13,000 needles to prevent HIV. (1988)

AUGUST 10

American painter Paul Thek dies of AIDS-related complications at age 54. (1988)

FDA approves Complera, a combination of emtricitabine, rilpivirine, and tenofovir alafenamide. (2011)

AUGUST 11

Greg Louganis presents Ryan White the gold medal he won in the three-meter springboard at the Pan American Games. (1987)

AUGUST 12

Chinese-American artist Martin Wong dies of AIDS-related complications at age 53. (1999)

  

AUGUST 13

Dudley Saunders speaks about Ethyl Eichelberger’s death at ACT UP. (1990)

AUGUST 14

Between Ten presented by Visual AIDS at SPIN Gallery during the XVI International AIDS Conference in Toronto, Canada. (2006)

AUGUST 15

Bobbi Campbell

Bobbi CampbellCourtesy of We Were Here/Marie Ueda

Self-proclaimed “AIDS Poster Boy” Bobbi Campbell dies of AIDS-related complications. (1984)

AUGUST 16

The Black AIDS Institutes hosts the community empowerment summit, AIDS 2016: Atlanta. (2016)

AUGUST 17

AUGUST 18

The FDA sanctions the first human testing of a candidate vaccine against HIV. (1987)

Congress enacts the Ryan White CARE Act, providing $220.5 million in funds for HIV care in its first year. (1990)

ACT UP members converge to protest during the Republican National Convention in Houston. (1992)

AUGUST 19

Activist Mary Fisher delivers her “A Whisper of AIDS” speech at the Republican National Convention. (1992)

AUGUST 20

AIDS activists disrupt a speech by George Bush at a $1,000-a-plate fundraising luncheon. (1992)

AUGUST 21

AUGUST 22

FDA approves Triumeq, a combination of abacavir, dolutegravir, and lamivudine. (2014)

AUGUST 23

FDA approves Serostim to treat wasting symptoms in people with AIDS. (1996)

The 2016 National Ryan White Conference on HIV Care and Treatment begins. (2016)

AUGUST 24

AUGUST 25

AUGUST 26

The Ministry of Health launches the first ever self-testing initiative in Vietnam. (2016)

AUGUST 27

FDA approves Stribild, a combination of elvitegravir, cobicistat, emtricitabine, and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate. (2012)

AUGUST 28

Arthur Ashe stamp

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The U.S. Postal Service issues a commemorative stamp to honor tennis star Arthur Ashe, who died of AIDS-related complications in 1993. (2005)

AUGUST 29

The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation is created. (1991)

AUGUST 30

John Hanning requests copies of his medical records and moves home to Arkansas to die. (1995)

Michael JeterPaul Smith/FeatureFlash/Dreamstime.com

Actor Michael Jeter (Evening Shade, Sesame Street) dies of AIDS-related causes. (2003)

AUGUST 31

The Pentagon declares that as of October 1, it will test all military recruits for HIV and reject those who test positive for the virus. (1985)


About the Artwork

darkroom danny, Appointments, 2015, Digital photograph

Appointments—a self portrait. As the virus silently replicated in my body I came to hear and know its presence through the numbers the doctors reeled off at my hospital appointments. Like a cartographer’s lines chart the land, my scribbles mapped the virus’s course.

—darkroom danny

Founded in 1988, Visual AIDS is the only contemporary arts organization fully committed to raising AIDS awareness and creating dialogue around HIV issues today, by producing and presenting visual art projects, exhibitions, public forums and publications—while assisting artists living with HIV/AIDS. Visual AIDS is committed to preserving and honoring the work of artists with HIV/AIDS and the artistic contributions of the AIDS movement.